rebound

rebound, reverberate, recoil, resile, repercuss are comparable when they mean to spring back to an original position or shape.
Rebound basically implies a springing back after a collision or impact
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the ball readily rebounds when thrown against a wall

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In extended use the term implies a springing back from one extreme to another or from an abnormal condition to one that is normal
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literature is rebounding again from the scientific-classical pole to the poetic-romantic oneEdmund Wilson

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Reverberate is used chiefly of rays or waves, most typically of sound waves, which are forced back in the manner of an echo or series of echoes or are repelled or reflected from side to side or from one surface to another
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the evening gun thundered from the fortress, and was reverberated from the heights— Hawthorne

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but it may be extended to other matters giving a similar effect
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presents even simple subjects with a perceptiveness that makes them reverberate in the mind— Babette Deutsch

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Recoil (see also RECOIL 1) often implies a springing back after being stretched, strained, or depressed
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a spring recoiling after pressure has been removed

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or a sudden or violent backward movement
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a gun recoils when it is fired

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Sometimes it carries the suggestion of a return to the source or point of origin in the manner of a boomerang
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that evidence missed the mark at which it was aimed, and recoiled on him from whom it proceeded— Macaulay

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But recoil often implies a springing back in the sense of being forced back by or as if by a blow; it then may connote a retreat, a receding, or a reeling
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ten paces huge he back recoiledMilton

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as deep recoiling surges foam below— Burns

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commentators recoiled from the spectacle as if it were too loathsome for remark— S. L. A. Marshall

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Resile, much less common than its corresponding adjective resilient, like recoil may imply a springing back (as of an elastic body) into the original state or position, but in practice it is largely restricted to an essentially legal use in which it implies a withdrawing from something to which one has previously committed oneself
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the suggestion which he had brought . . . meant that India was seeking to resile from its solemn international commitments— Pakistan Affairs

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Repercuss, also much less common than its corresponding noun repercussion and adjective repercussive, is a close synonym of reverberate and rebound, for it implies the return of something moving ahead with great force or, in extended use, set in motion or operation, back to or toward the starting point. However it distinctively suggests repulsion upon impact and a return with undiminished force, or sometimes even greater force, and often, when persons are involved, with a marked effect upon the ones who initiated the action
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the waves dashed against the rocks and repercussed with a great roar

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sickness produces an abnormally sensitive emotional state . . . and in many cases the emotional state repercusses ... on the organic disease— Peabody

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Analogous words: bound, *skip, ricochet

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • Rebound — can refer to:* Rebound (sports), in sports, refers to the ball becoming freely available after a failed attempt to put it into the goal ** Rebound (basketball), the act of successfully gaining possession of the basketball in such a scenario… …   Wikipedia

  • Rebound! — Origin Sweden Genres Pop, R B Years active 2010 April 2010 Labels Sony Music Website …   Wikipedia

  • rebound — rebound, redound 1. Rebound is pronounced with the stress on the first syllable as a noun and with the stress on the second syllable as a verb. 2. The image with the verb rebound is of something bouncing back, and with redound it is of a tide or… …   Modern English usage

  • Rebound — (englisch für Abprall, Rückprall oder abprallen, zurückprallen) steht für: das Fangen des Balls nach einem missglückten Korbversuch, siehe Rebound (Basketball) Effekte, die das Einsparpotenzial von Effizienzmaßnahmen reduzieren oder ganz… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • rebound — ► VERB 1) bounce back after hitting a hard surface. 2) recover in value, amount, or strength. 3) (rebound on/upon) have an unexpected adverse consequence for. ► NOUN 1) a ball or shot that rebounds. 2) an instance of recovering in value, amount,… …   English terms dictionary

  • rebound — [ri bound′; ] also, and for vi. 4 & n. usually [, rē′bound΄] vi. [ME rebounden < OFr rebondir] 1. to bound back; spring back upon impact with something 2. to reecho or reverberate 3. to leap or spring, as in recovery [his spirits rebounded ] ☆ …   English World dictionary

  • Rebound — Re*bound , n. 1. The act of rebounding; resilience. [1913 Webster] Flew . . . back, as from a rock, with swift rebound. Dryden. [1913 Webster] 2. recovery, as from sickness, psychological shock, or disappointment. [PJC] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Rebound — Re*bound (r[ e]*bound ), v. i. [Pref. re + bound: cf. F. rebondir.] 1. To spring back; to start back; to be sent back or reverberated by elastic force on collision with another body; as, a rebounding echo. [1913 Webster] Bodies which are… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Rebound — Re*bound , v. t. To send back; to reverberate. [1913 Webster] Silenus sung; the vales his voice rebound. Dryden. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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